Germany’s Assimilation Problem

Germany’s Assimilation Problem

Photo Source: Tatic, Creative Commons

Photo Source: Tatic, Creative Commons

Samuel Valk, Politics Contributor

Traveling and visiting other countries and cultures is one of the most amazing experiences you will ever do in your life. You get to see new lands, historic artifacts and structures, and witness other cultures and how other people besides yourself live. You broaden yourself as a person, especially when you are immersed in whatever culture you’re in for an extended period of time. There are many people, including myself, who have spent periods of time outside of their home culture and country. I personally, however, did not go there and ethnocentrically expect them to do things the “American way.” I had to get used to their way of doing things as I was in their country and their culture, and if I did not like it, I was free to leave whenever I wished. This must be applied to all people who intend on living in a place they are migrating to. However, Middle Eastern migrants are a primary example of those who refrain from assimilating into their host country’s society, causing divisions like we have seen in recent years.

Germany, led by Merkel, in 2014 decided to essentially open its borders to any migrant who wanted entry into the country. This was a response to the ongoing Syrian Civil War, which has displaced nearly the entire country. However, over 55% of the 1 million/year migrants were not even Syrian. They were migrants fleeing economic circumstances, not political or war circumstances. Germany then decided to not coax them to assimilate into German society. They took in over 2 million non Germans, increasing their population numerous percentage points in just a couple of years. The lack of assimilation has created areas in Germany where German people are advised not to enter, or “no-go zones.” These zones are marked by heavy crime, especially sexual crimes against women, as they are not taught the German way that women are equal to men. It may sound crude, but Germany has essentially said that as they now have courses for the migrants to “teach them not to rape.”

The problem, however, runs even deeper. The German government tried to cover up the Cologne New Years 2016 migrant rape attacks. They did not admit anything happened until months after the fact. Not only is the government not promoting assimilation of the migrants; the government is actively discouraging it. German women are told to adapt to their cultures when in the “no-go zones” and are told how not to be sexually assaulted when out in public in general. Instead of trying to catch and deport the people involved in the sexual assaults, Germany is doing the opposite and giving the migrants special protections over the native Germans, most likely to protect the feelings of the migrants as a group. This is actively discouraging assimilation because it is now precedent in Germany to throw migrant sex and other violent crimes under a rug. It is better to be a migrant in Germany than a native German in these regards.  

As well, the German government is now actively investigating “anti-migrant” speech as hate speech, even if the speaker is on Facebook. They are actively trying to crack down on opinions given by the general German population that do not fall into line with what the German government has defined as “tolerance” to the other cultures. However, this tolerance is only expected of native Germans. For the migrants in Germany, they are allowed to play by different rules. Migrants are allowed more freedoms of speech than native Germans, even going so far as to praise Hitler and the Holocaust in the streets of Berlin. If a native German or white tourist does anything similar, he is usually jailed. Even criticizing the rape crisis on Facebook that has been plaguing Germany since the migrants began coming in is grounds to be charged with hate-speech in Germany, as the German government and Facebook have been working together to weed out “hate speech” against migrants.

Germany’s final, biggest problem is the taking in of these migrants without any kind of background check or seeing if they are indeed refugees instead of just immigrants. The problem has been too much for Germany to handle, as it has led to a sharp increase in terrorism and crime. These sharp increases in people who do not know German, are not German culturally, and are protected for not being culturally German has allowed separate communities of migrants to spring up in Germany as no-go zones. These areas are places where police have essentially given up on policing and the government has stopped governing. They are essentially separate legal entities within Germany. Since the migrants were allowed such freedom to do such things, they will not want to give up this power they have in their communities to the German government and will not do it for the German people as they are protected over the German natives by the government. The German government has allowed this to simmer and continue, and it will keep getting worse if it is not taken care of now.

Native Germans are already on track to becoming an ethnic, linguistic, and cultural minority within their own country by 2050 if they do not handle the separate areas no longer within German control. People need to assimilate to their host country if they are going to stay long term. It is what decent people do when they migrate to a new country. We wouldn’t expect a traded athlete to wear the jersey from their old team. No, they are on a new team with new jerseys. The migrants in Germany have done the exact opposite and the German government is subsidizing the migrants for doing so. This will not end well for Germany if it is not put under control very soon.

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