Eugenics: Past, Present, and Future

Eugenics: Past, Present, and Future

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Timothy Schlum, Social Policy Contributor

Charles Darwin, Margaret Sanger, and Adolf Hitler all had something in common: their passion for eugenics. The way Darwin, Sanger, and Hitler defined their movement is terrifying to read. Darwin outlined the movement as a, “process of elimination,” Sanger described eugenics as reducing “undesirables,” and, finally, Hitler described it as, “eliminating the inferior.” Today, many leftists define the term as, “progressive social engineering.” The idea of eugenics is wicked and barbaric and in the age of information, despite there being a long road ahead, there’s hope that we can make some positive change in the near future.

The idea of eugenics began with Charles Darwin and his theory of social darwinism back in the 19th century. From there notable people such as, Francis Galton and Charles Davenport, continued the eugenics campaign across all of England, the United States, and most of western civilization. After Galton and Davenport died, Margaret Sanger picked up where they left off and later discovered a way to make the idea of eugenics actually come true; Sanger reintroduced the method of abortion back into society and later developed a company called Planned Parenthood.  Many political scientists believe Margaret Sanger influenced Adolf Hitler, which possibly furthered his gross obsession over the idea of an “aryan” race, which led to the deaths of tens of millions of innocent people throughout World War II.

Back in 2001, John Donohue and Steven Levitt of Freakonomics released a study addressing the correlation between Roe vs Wade and a drop in crime rates. Despite the study showing evidence that legalized abortions lead to lower crime rates, Levitt goes on to say, "in no way would I take this as advocacy in favor of legalized abortion." Which leads us to a follow up question, if more abortions lead to less crime, why don't we abort any child, or fully developed person, who is not "perfect"? Asking a question like that should shine a light on the sheer ridiculousness of the idea of eugenics and abortion.

In 1927, the United States Supreme Court took up a case titled Buck vs Bell. This case was based around the question, “is it legal for a state government to deem any of their citizens ‘too feeble minded’ to have children and then physically force them to become sexually sterilized to guarantee that they can never procreate because their children might negatively contribute to the society?” After only a few days of deliberation, the Supreme Court ruled 8-1 that the state’s argument was valid and did not violate the Due Process clause of the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, thus any citizen deemed “too feeble minded,” by their state’s government can institute compulsory sterilization. This ruling has never been overturned by the United States Supreme Court, just like Roe vs Wade.

Knowing the history of eugenics and abortion and knowing the people behind those movements (Darwin, Galton, Davenport, Sanger, Hitler) it has become abundantly clear that we have a lot of work to do. There are at least two Supreme Court cases that must be overturned, Buck v. Bell and Roe v. Wade. There is a barbaric procedure called abortion taking the lives of hundreds of thousands of children around the world everyday. And, finally, since we are in the age of information, it is our obligation to spread truth to our neighbors and pray that the information we speak leads to positive change in our communities, our country, and the rest of the world.
    
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